Sunday, 24 February 2013

Where Do Snowflakes Come From?

Provocation for a new

Inquiry


“I Wonder where snowflakes come
from.” - S.M.



While at the art center, one of the children used oil pastels to draw snowflakes. After drawing a few snowflakes, S.M. asked: “I wonder where snowflakes come from.” This was the provocation for a new inquiry on snowflakes.
During Sharing our Learning Time, S.M. shared this question and piece of art with the other children. Many of the children had their own questions and theories about snowflakes.


Watercolour Representations of the 

Children's Theories about Snowflakes



Where do snowflakes come from?

C.Z.: snowflakes come from the sky. The clouds.
E.L.: The snow clouds.
A.L.: They come from the clouds and I think they come from the North Pole.
M.Y.: When it rains and the air makes the rain so cold then the rain turns into snow.
C.L.: The snow comes at the Winter.
T.K.: When the cold air turns into rain the rain gets so cold it turns into snowflakes then it melts and turns into water.
A.L.: Water.
S.K.: The snow goes up and down and there will be water.
I.G.: Snowflakes come from up to the clouds and when it’s raining so much that’s how the snowflakes it makes.



How might the clouds make snowflakes?


E.L.: little tiny snowflakes in the clouds and when they bump into each other they make bigger snowflakes and when the sky gets darker that means it’s going to snow.
A.L.: they use water and they put it on them and then it’s going to come down from the sky.
S.M.: The water goes up to the clouds and then it snows. The water from the lakes goes into the clouds and the water turns into snow in the clouds and then when it gets heavy and dark it starts to snow.





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